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Discussion Starter #1

So, you just bought a car, something showroom fresh with fewer miles on the odometer than a new pair of shoes.


Naturally, you’ll want to do everything you can to protect this investment. Properly breaking the engine in will do its part to help ensure a long and trouble-free life.

But opinions differ on how this should be accomplished. Some experts advocate performing a hard break-in. This includes a certain amount of heavy acceleration during the vehicle’s first few miles. The goal of this is to force piston rings against cylinder walls so these metal parts can seat before the bores’ honing marks are worn away. Done properly, this supposedly results in an engine that produces more power and lasts longer.
How do you guys break in your new car's engine? Read more at AutoGuide.com
 

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Didn't read the entire article yet but I never went hard break-in , always followed the mfg tips and I know that things change.
I haven't bought a 'new' car in a long time.

I even hear that synthetic oil is not necessarily the way to go on a new motor ie; The break in isn't the same with a different spec lube and it may take longer to do the break-in and get things properly seated etc...
Longer delay on that does seem counter intuitive.
 

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The article did find sources or agree with break-in parts needing some normal friction that normal motor oil (mineral) allows versus man-made lubricants / synthetic.

It also reminded me that many suggest an early oil change on or within the first 1000 miles or so just in case anything gets flushed from the motor into the filter. I don't consider an early oil change in that case as wasteful since it's cheap insurance.

This is really a timely article since new car sales have been so strong in recent years. I think many consumers associate technology with not needing to know the details about what they own and how to properly take care of it or maintain it.
In fact with motors so expensive, they could not be more wrong if it means improper care / poor maintenance or neglect.

Funny thing that comes to mind is all the people I know that are strong car mechanics or engineering background, if not outright genius level and their (adult) kids are typically the ones I hear about that let a motor go nearly dry of oil never taking the time to check it and top it off. :surprise:
 
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